Hello again,
Last issue was so focused on what’s going on with Angular 2.0 and how it’s going to affect Angular 1.3. In future issues I’ll assume you are business as usual with 1.3 while still interested in what the 2.0 situation is going to be like. But for now, this is going to be another Angular 1.3/2.0 heavy issue.

Please let me know if you preferred the variety in previous issues more, or whether you prefer the full focus to be on Angular. As usual, just reply to this email (my address is eng.meligy@gmail.com), or shout at me on twitter (as @Meligy).

Speaking of twitter, I’d really appreciate if you tweet about the newsletter to your friends. Here’s a pre-written example. Use a pre-written tweet by clicking here or write your own.

One last thing before we start if you are in Sydney, Australia. I’m starting a new Angular usergroup called ng-sydney. I’m still working out the logistics (venue, etc), but it seems like it’ll be great. Please RSVP to the first meetup so that I can estimate how many will show up. BTW, I’m also looking for speakers, so let me know if you’d like to speak.

AngularJS 2.0

Correction

In Issue 4 of the newsletter the write up mixed the $scope and Directive Definition Object DDO together. The writing suggested they were the same thing in the part that mentioned the removal of $scope.

This is wrong. The DDO is the object that defines the directive, the one that has the compile and link functions and restrict and scope properties. Both are going away in Angular 2.0 though in favor of EcmaScript classes and AtScript annotations (like Attributes in C#).

References

The links in this section are ones that really should have made it to Issue 4, except I only found them shortly after the issue went out.

All About Angular 2.0
This is THE place to learn about everything related to Angular 2.0. This is a very comprehensive article written by Rob Eisenberg (@EisenbergEffect on twitter), the creator of DurandalJS who joined the AngularJS team a few months ago (he is mainly working on the router, but also trying to influence other areas).

Video: Angular 2.0
You can think of this as the video version of the previous article. In this video Rob explains the same points in his post, and for some (including myself), it’s a bit easier to just sit and watch!

Podcasts

The Angular team has been trying to show up to respond to the Angular 2 panic. Most of the answers are like “ES6 is a must and it doesn’t make sense to have our own way of what it does” and “There’s no migration path because we don’t have Angular 2 yet. When we finalize what it’ll be like, we’ll work on a migration path” as I keep mentioning, but still, listen to it in their own words:

Audio: Adventures in Angular: NG 1.3 and 2.0 with Brad Green, Igor Minar, and Miško Hevery
I mentioned the Adventures in Angular podcast in Issue 1 of this newsletter. They dedicated an episode to talk to the Angular team about Angular 2.
There’s also a transcript by John Papa if you prefer to read:
The Angular Team on Angular 1.3 and the Road Ahead to Angular 2.0

Video: Angular Air Episode 0: The Angular Team on 1.3 & 2.0
This is a special first episode of yet another Angular.JS podcast, except it’s a video podcast (using Google Hangouts). You can learn more about the podcast on ng-air.github.io.
Personal commentary: I don’t know what 2 podcasts would be good for, and I hate that it’s only available on YouTube because it means I can’t listen to it easily on phone (Android’s YouTube application pauses if the screen goes off), but they have a very strong start getting the Angular team in.

Different Angles…

AngularJS: The Bad Parts
This is critic of Angular 1.x, but it’s amazing if you look at it in the context of Angular 2, which solves all these problems.
Talk about dynamic scoping? Scope is going. Talk about dependency injection based on parameter name and confusing $inject property? Dependency injection is changing too. Talk about reinventing constructor methods, execution contexts and other JS concepts? This is all going away in favor of ES6 concepts (we still need to see how far the AtScript extension will go still).

This tweet also surprisingly got a little bit more traction than my usual (being a non twitter celebrity, the bar is admittedly quite low):

There’re a few other writings on Angular.JS 2.0 from well known people, but it’s all like: “Angular 2.0 is like Python 3, or is it? And is that a good or a bad thing?”, so, I just skipped these.

AngularJS 1.3

Have you heard of Angular-Hint?
Angular-Hint is a run time tool (a script you add to your page) that can tell you about anything you are doing wrong in your Angular code (via the browser console).
The tool didn’t get the attention it deserves when it was mentioned in ng-europe due to all the Angular 2 buzz, so I wrote this post in order to fix that!

AngularJS: Demystifying Directives
In a directive, does the controller function get called before or after the link function (or functions, pre and post link). Which is the best place to make changes to the HTML element? The article is a very good read even if you think you know directives pretty well

Ultimate guide to learning AngularJS in one day
From time to time, you need to refer a good tutorial to a newbie, or maybe check one yourself. Here’s what I found prior this issue.

Code School: Shaping up with Angular.js:
A new introductory course to Angular JS from Code School. They’ve kindly made it available for free.

EmberJS

Side note: I expect Ember to get a bit more traction coming from the Angular 2.0 panic. After all, it is the closest framework to it, and one of the 3 big frameworks IMHO: Angular, Ember, React (from Facebook).

React still a bit of a niche. It’s quite different from the usual MV* style frameworks like Angular and Ember, maybe a bit like Backbone, except its typical development involves some special .jsx files with HTML mixed with JS.

Ember feels the most natural alternative for those who decide to avoid Angular for now. It also has a great documentation and migration stories (both things it used to lack for long but now nails).

Rails JS frameworks: Ember.js vs. AngularJS
A very good Ember-Angular comparison, heavily focused on Rails and Rails tooling etc, but there’re a few good points even if you don’t use Rails.

Yahoo now uses Ember for all internal and external ads & data web apps
An interesting reddit comment spotted and shared on twitter by Tom Dale (@tomdale), the creator of EmberJS.

Ember.JS 1.8.0 And 1.9 BETA Released
A very good example of how Ember.JS manages version upgrades. Ember 1.8.0 is equivalent to 1.3.0 in Angular, except they are handling the version transition very nicely. Note the deprecation model similar to jQuery’s when deciding to change things in a major release.

The Road to Ember 2.0 RFC
Directly from Github, a “request for comments” pull request is exactly what decides what Ember.JS 2.0 is going to be like. Amazing!

Learning EmberJS


Not really a tutorial guide in itself, but good collection of resource and plan to study Ember if you consider learning it

ReactJS

Well, we talked about Ember, so, here’s another one for React :)
BTW, React is being used in a few areas of Facebook itself I heard, like the comments.

Reactive MVC and the Virtual DOM
Apart from learning how to get started with React, this tutorial explains the approach the framework takes to work in the first place. For example, instead of extending the DOM and writing to it, React uses the shadow DOM (think the non-modifiable :before and :after elements you use in CSS for styling) for rending its views. This is very similar to the way Web Components typically works. It has some polyfill for older browsers though (up to IE8 I think).

HTML 5

Open Web Platform Milestone Achieved with HTML5 Recommendation
Do you know that HTML5 as a final W3C recommendation was only published end of last month? Yes, October 28, 2014. See the HTML5 recommendation page.

5 Obsolete Features in HTML5
First, obsolete means probably not supported. This is a bit different than deprecated which means it’s not obsolete yet but will be sometime in the future.
Here’re the five: the hgroup element, the pubdate attribute on time element, the scoped attribute on style element, the command element, and the center element (the only one a few might still be using for dirty hacks). A few are actually fun to read about!

Free Books

The following are books that you can read freely online, but you are also encouraged to buy / support them if you find them useful, to help the people working on them keep the great work.

Pro Git – 2nd Edition
The 2nd edition of THE git book, the official extensive Git reference.

High Performance Browser Networking Book
This book by Ilya Grigorik, a web performance engineer and developer advocate at Google (you should follow him on twitter or G+) covers everything about networking that many web developers should know, but they probably don’t.
I suggest you take a look at the table of contents, find areas which you feel more interesting (I’m certain you’ll find a few interesting areas you didn’t know about as you thought you did) and give them a read.

Craftsmanship

I came up with this category just to put the following article into this issue. It’s the best article I have found in a while, even though it’s not about code.

How to find your passion
Behind this very simple title a GREAT article that will make you redefine what passion is, and that’s a VERY good thing. If you don’t buy into the self-help stuff, I highly recommend you make this one an exception. A must read for pretty much everyone IMHO.

More from @Meligy / GuruStop

If you have made it that far in the issue, and you like what I brought you today, let’s connect in even more ways!

Follow Me On twitter — @Meligy

Check The Newsletter Archive — gurustop.net/newsletter

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Remember that you can just reply to this email or mention me on twitter to tell me what you feel needs to change in next issue. And please to tweet it to your friends too, the more people enjoying this, the more it encourages me to make it better.

Until next issue,

Meligy

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angular-hint is like js-hint for Angular.JS. It’s a JavaScript file you add to your application (typically in dev/debug mode only). Then it notifies you when you do anything that’s considered an anti-pattern in Angular.JS (or completely wrong, which by default sometimes produces no error and visible effect to see / debug). It does so by logging messages to the browser console.

angular-hint-in-action

It’s created by the Angular team (most work by Brian Ford) under the official Github account. The Github repo says it’s a work-in-progress, but it works very nicely.

It works best with Angular 1.3 (the best Angular we have to day), and it even works with Angular 1.2 telling you about any code issues that could be problematic when you upgrade to 1.3 (not sure if that part is functional).

It has different categories of notifications that you can turn on and off individually. Like controllers, directives, events, modules, and much more.

An interesting futuristic take on Angular-Hint is that this is also the place where the team will start adding warnings about practices that might be problematic when you upgrade to Angular 2. This is not there yet (because we aren’t close to having an Angular 2 yet), but this is the plan as the team mentioned in the “Adventures in Angular” podcast.

Learning Angular-Hint

This post is not a tutorial in itself. Just a nudge for those who may have not noticed it through the Angular 2 buzz in ng-europe. So, here are the best resource I have found to day to learn more:

Video: Tooling by Brian Ford at ng-europe 2014
In this ng-europe video, Brian Ford provide an excellent explanation of the need to something like angular-hint, and a few different ways it can help you. You can also check the session slides on Google Docs.

Exploring Angular 1.3 – Angular-hint
A great blog post on angular-hint the describes the different categories it has and shows examples of how it works. This was where I learned about angular-hint even before watching the ng-europe video.

A Quick Final Note

this post is just one part of the upcoming Issue 5 of my AngularJS & Web Development newsletter. If you like what you see, you can subscribe to the newsletter via the form at the top right side of the page, or through the signup page.

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Hello there,
First, allow me to welcome all the new subscribers who joined the newsletter since last issue. You can view the newsletter archive at any time on gurustop.net/newsletter. I’d also like to thank all the subscribers who have been on board for a few issues already. Please make sure to tweet about the newsletter to all your friends to get on board as well.

This time we have a bit of a theme around ng-Europe conference and recent Angular.JS 1.3 and 2.0 announcements.

A small warning though. This is a bit of a different issue. One that I get to be a bit more chatty at instead of just describing the links being shared. As always, I’d love to hear from you whether this style is better or worse. Reply to this email or mention me on twitter as @Meligy.

ng-europe

ng-europe is the European version (was held in Paris) of ng-conf 2014, the first big single-track Angular.JS conference. It took 2 days with presenters from the Angular team and community leaders. The conference is important as it’s the place where the Angular team finally explained their big plans for Angular 2.0, and a few related topics got more exposure like Angular Material Design.

Conference Notes:  Day 1  |  Day 2    (biggest announcements came out in day 2)
A wiki-style collection of notes written by conference attendees. The best place to go to for getting a summary of the conference. You can later decide which sessions you might want to watch in details.

Video: All ng-europe Videos
All the conference videos are on YouTube. Check them out. Plenty of good stuff.

ng-europe Session Slides
For times when/if you need to refer to any of the session of the session slides.

Video: ng-conf 2014 Videos & Slides
I found this while preparing the newsletter, from the same site that put the ng-europe slides together. If you are bored you can check it out. Most if not all topics are still relevant.

Angular 1.3

Angular 1.3 was announced in early October, the main focus has been speed improvement and getting some directive improvements for form manipulation. We see one-time bindings, new way to create validations and show error messages, and more. Beware though, no IE 8 support.

Official Announcement — AngularJS 1.3.0 – superluminal-nudge
The post where Angular.JS 1.3 was announced. A good summary with links to documentation for each of the new major features. There’s alway the full changelog as well.

Vide: Angular 1.3 by Jeff Cross & Brian Ford at ng-europe 2014
I thought I’d highlight this video in particular. If you have 20 minutes to spare, watch this video, a good walkthrough of the features from the team that developed them.

Angular 2.0

Angular 2.0 has been in design phase since last December, while Angular.Js 1.3 was in development as well. Since then, we knew Angular 2.0 is going to be a big change and a complete rewrite, but we didn’t know how big exactly till ng-europe.

In Angular 2.0, the team plan to use EcmaScript 6 module system to replace Angular’s own module system AND dependency injection.

They also plan to use ES 6 classes to create directives in a new way that doesn’t just replace the current directive system but also the Angular controllers. With no controller, there will be no $scope as well (they referred to $scope as “Directive Definition Object”, DDO in ng-europe).

While on it, Angular 2.0 will also get rid of jqLite in favor of using the DOM directly (since it’s designed for modern browsers, where the DOM API has evolved enough already).

RIP in AngularjsJS 2

Video: Angular 2.0 Core by Igor Minar & Tobias Bosch at ng-europe 2014
(Just highlighting the relevant ng-europe video)

The announcement of Angular 2.0 had many reactions, more negative than positive. The main issue is that Angular 2.0 as explained in ng-europe feels like an entirely different framework.

Angular 1.x (The way from 1.3 to 2.0)

The announcement of Angular 2.0 makes people very skeptical of using Angular 1.x, even with Angular 1.3 still new, having tons of great features and performance. Here are a few write ups and news that help you make an informed decision whether to use Angular 1.x or not.

New Project Lead for Angular 1.x
Igor Minar (@IgorMinar on twitter), the AngularJS team lead, has decided to assign the most active Angular.JS community member as the leader of Angular 1.x. He says that there’s a lot of work to be done in Angular 1.x and if he focuses on both releases, not much of it will happen as he’s mainly focusing on Angular 2.0. Also check Angular 1.x: The plan forward, the letter Igor wrote to the team about the change.

Angular.JS Weekly Meeting
While not specific to Angular 1.x, this seems to THE place to watch for what’s happening in the Angular 1.x space. It’s as close as we can get to what the team is thinking, at least for now.

If you watched the ng-europe videos, you might be confused about the migration path from Angular 1.x to 2.0, as it looked like there isn’t going to be any. Looking at the plans and meetings for Angular.JS team, there are a few hints that suggest things might be a bit better than expected.

For example, there is a plan to share some critical components between Angular 1.x (1.3 in fact) and 2.0. Material Design and the Angular 2.0 router are the biggest names to mention in this context. Some 3rd party libraries have similar ambition as well, like Restangular.

Screw You Angular
Although the title suggests a rant, this post is actually tries to address all the criticism AngularJS got for lack of obvious migration path from 1.x to 2.0 (I was collecting these posts for the newsletter since they had very good points, but changed my mind as the post links to them anyway).
The answer the post provides is that the team hasn’t thought about migration because Angular 2.0 doesn’t exist yet! Once v2.0 gets more shape, the team can then think what the migration path to that could look like.
Not a very bad argument, and since the author is an AngularJS insider, it’s more of a knowledge than a guess.

AtScript

It seems that even EcmaScript 6 was not enough for Angular 2.0 vision of declarative programming that the team decided to implement their own language, AtScript! Crazy, huh?

It sure it. Many reject Facebook’s JavaScript framework, ReactJS, just because it introduces a new language (extension of JavaScript, .jsx files) that mixes HTML and JavaScript and requires its own compiler to translate to JavaScript. Angular.JS did something similar except the syntax isn’t as weird.

AtScript, is an extension of TypeScript that should be able to compile to ES 6 (and then can be compiled to ES 5, the current JavaScript) or Dart (I know, I don’t care too, but BTW, most of the PoCs and early experiments of Angular 2.0 and some 1.x were in Dart). It adds some annotations that the framework will use to differentiate different kinds of directives and more…

AtScript

AtScript, Google’s new superset JavaScript runtime
A good article with highlights from the ng-europe session.

Video: Miško Hevery – Keynote on AtScript at ng-europe 2014
The video of day 2 keynote where AtScript was announced. Pretty fun to watch BTW.

Video: ES6 in Angular 2.0 by Erik Arvidsson at ng-europe 2014
This video explains how Google is planning to extend its ES 6 to ES 5 compiler so that it handles AtScript as well (from the user point of view). You get to see how the pieces of the puzzle come together.

AtScript Primer
The official AtScript design document.

If you are like me, you must have been quite surprised that Google has considered Microsoft’s TypeScript as a base for AtScript, here’s what Sir Anders Hejlsberg, the father of C# and TypeScript, thinks about that, in 140 letters or less:

More from @Meligy / GuruStop

Thanks a lot for making it that far. If you like what I brought you today, let’s connect in even more ways!

Follow me on twitter — @Meligy

Check The Newsletter Archive — http://gurustop.net/newsletter

Get friends to receive the newsletter — http://gurustop.net/newsletter/signup

Remember that you can just reply to this email or mention me on twitter to tell me what you feel needs to change in next issue. And please to tweet it to your friends too, the more people enjoying this, the more it encourages me to make it better.

Until next issue,

Meligy

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Today a friend (Amr Eldib) asked a question on Facebook that I think a few of you may have as well:

security-lock

I’ve never setup a Virtual Private Server out in the open on the Internet, and I was wondering how safe it would be?

I prefer Windows, because it’s what I know.

It’s intended to run all kinds of applications, blog, CMS, Wiki, file sync, photo storage, etc.

From your experience, what safety/security steps I need to pay attention to?

Does the security of the server depend on the applications or the OS, or both?

I had a relatively short and simple answer to this question. I’m sharing it here with you pretty much as-is.

My Answer

If you are looking for affordable host, I’ve always recommended SoftSys Hosting.

For most hosts, the server is locked down by default. Any OS will be subject to vulnerabilities though, so, make sure you have latest Windows updates (it’s OK to have Windows 2008 R2 instead of 2012 R2, might be better actually due to less resources it uses, any OS that’s not out of support should be OK).

The most common attacks are usually random attacks, the attacks that go to random servers trying to open default port numbers, default usernames and weak passwords, and try to identify / guess what software is installed on the server, and use the known vulnerabilities that exist in that software, in the hope that you didn’t have these patched.

Things you can do are removing/disabling accounts with default names like Administrator, etc., changing default port numbers for things like SQL DBMS and FTP / SSH if you use any, making sure things like SQL DBMS do NOT allow remote connections in the first place.

Also the application can be a thread. For example, hMailServer uses OpenSSL, so you need the latest version to make sure you don’t have OpenSSL hole. WordPress now installs minor/security updates automatically but you always want to check, and maybe even be careful what plugins you use.

Apply same rule to similar software packages.

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Hey there,
Welcome to Issue 3 of the newsletter. If you want to check the previous editions, you can go to gurustop.net/newsletter. You can access a particular issue like, for Issue 2 you go to gurustop.net/newsletter/2.

This time I have played a bit with the schedule and the order of sections. The idea is to experience different ways and hear your feedback on what works better. either on twitter or by email (simply replying to this message).

SEO — News

Video: Google will render JavaScript by end of the year
During AngularJS NYC usrgroup for September 2014, Brad Green, a Google engineering manager working on Angular.JS among other things said that Google crawler will render all JavaScript by the end of this year, and their should be tooling for checking that in Google Webmaster Tools as well – Discuss on reddit.

Angular.JS — Libraries

bind once for Angular.JS < 1.3
A set of directives that allow you to bind values to the UI only once instead of watching for model changes to update the UI. This is particularly useful when you have a long readonly list inside ng-repeat where most properties are unlikely to change until the entire list changes (and then the whole template will be re-rendered).
The concept is now native in Angular.JS 1.3, and there are other libraries that try to enhance it, like angular-watch-require and angular-watch-when.

overmind.js
If you use require.js and want to have lazy-loaded modules with it, there are several tries out there that get that sort of thing done. If all you want though is just lazy loaded modules that are loaded and bootstrapped on the fly when a certain route tree is matched (like areas in ASP​.NET MVC Areas or Rails Namespaces). Might be good for large Angular.JS apps. It also has been mentioned on the Adventures in Angular podcast.

JavaScript — MVC Frameworks

MVC Architecture
A very nice article about how we don’t exactly implement MVC as 3 parts, Model, View, and Controller. We usually had other parts too. I think the closest way to how I implement MVC is the last picture in the article.

Why I Don’t Want Your JavaScript Framework but I Love You
If you are in the mood of reading about what homework you may want to do before you actually go ahead and use a JavaScript framework, this could be a good read.

JavaScript — Ember.JS

I have a few links for Ember.JS this time that it will feel like I’m moving to it, although I’m not, I still find its innovation very inspiring as you’ll see below.

Mistakes I Made in My First Ember Project
If you have been following the newsletter for a bit, you know I value knowing how other SPA/MVC/MV* frameworks solve the same problems that Angular.JS solves. I think this knowledge is beneficial regardless of the framework because many of the issues have equivalent in every framework, and thinking about different approaches can really help you get the most out of whatever framework you use.

Event Delegation in Ember.JS – StackOverflow
When you use ng-click inside ng-repeat in Angular.JS, it doesn’t usually set one event handler for the parent of the element and use event bubbling to set it, although you can do it yourself via a directive. It was interesting to find out randomly via StackOverflow that event bubbling is how Ember.JS works by default!

Building rich single-page application with Ember.js
Historically, one of the things that stopped many people from learning Ember.JS was how hard it was to get to understand its pieces. This is now changing a lot (or may I say changed?) with better documentation and more great guides, like this one, which was very simple and lovely to browse.

JavaScript — ES6

Traceur is Awesome! … but still a little Painful
Don’t be turned off by the title. Traceur is a nice tool from Google to compile ES6 code to ES5 code that can run in any ES5 browser (most browsers, and even older ones can be polyfilled). This post describes what the experience is like when using it (.NET people might find using TypeScript a better option for its VS integration though, although it’s not not exactly ES6, you can sometimes go even crazier with some F# mix).

JavaScript — Debugging / Performance

Video: Advanced Debugging Techniques with Chrome
A must see video of what goodies exist in Google Chrome dev tools (including some of the relatively new features like new enhancements to emulation), this is probably a must-watch video for you. I have been using the tools for years and found quite a few things I didn’t know before.

JS Parse and Execution Time
When you use a framework (quite often you should), there’s only so much you can control in terms of performance. This article examines the time it takes to parse and execute jQuery on so many browsers and devices. It has some interesting observations, like how the total times vary like crazy between different devices, and how device hardware is still the major determinator is hardware rather than software (OS or browser).

Security – HTTPS

I think we are in the (very?) early days that will lead to all websites running HTTPS by default. Apart from privacy concerns, SCARY attacks, there’s also industry leaders push and relative ease of implementation. But it’s not something that everyone needs to worry about just yet.

SSL and SEO: Don’t Panic
There are a few messages that I want to send from sharing this:
1. Google announced they will consider SSL as one of its many ranking factors
2. This doesn’t mean you should freak out if you are not using SSL (the point of the link above)
3. But SSL is worth it anyway, as in most recent hardware and software (including IIS 8 and maybe 7.5) it’s already fast (the traditional old concern about SSL, apart from cost for tiny websites).

Slides: Is TLS fast yet?
If you are thinking about implementing HTTPS and worried about CPU performance, your server documentation documentation should tell you whether there are significant performance overhead (I checked some common ones and they were all saying nothing to worry about). This presentation helps assure the same idea.

Cloudflare – Introducing Universal SSL
The well known CDN provider Cloudflare announces availability of SSL services for all their plans, including their free plan. They serve files in HTTPS, and can be configured to pull assets (as source files to publish on the CDN) from HTTPS URLs as well. Here’s a basic write up of how to use it.

Security — General

Waxing Poetic with SwiftOnSecurity
I didn’t plan to make this newsletter mostly about security as it ended up being, but this story that reminds us of how some users can be so vulnerable in a way we can’t blame them for, is quite a good read.

Microsoft — Windows 10

Video: Windows 10: Enterprise Features & Core Experience for Businesses
You must have seen a ton of Windows 10 videos already, for me, this was pretty much the deepest one of them that related to me as a developer and showed the philosophy of the product.
One fun moment in the beginning of the video was giving a reason for the name, Windows 10 (instead of Windows 9), apart from considering Windows 8.1 as 9 (if you want) which the video didn’t suggest, it said that the main idea was calling it Windows One, similar to Xbox One and One Drive, etc. Windows One was taken as Windows 1, so they went for Windows 10! (if this is silly still – I think it was meant to be more funny than true-, I promise the rest of the video isn’t).

Video: Scott Hanselman Detailed Windows 10 Tour in just 8 Minutes
Scott is very well known in the ASP​.NET developer community as his work at Microsoft is mainly around that community and ASP​.NET MVPs, etc. He is a great person and speaker. His Windows videos are not something that he does for work, which makes them even greater and more realistic.

Windows 10 Insider Program / Preview
Just in case you missed the URL to get the technical preview! I have heard a few positive comments from some of those who played with it, especially on a Surface laptop (of course).

Apple / IPhone / iOS — Quick Links

iPhone 6 Screens Demystified
Also check their iPhone resolutions guide

iOS 8, thoroughly reviewed
Very long / detailed review

Video: Steve Jobs introduces WiFi to the masses with a hula hoop!

JavaScript — Quick Links

Promises in the Google APIs JavaScript Client Library
Google’s JavaScript SDK now return promises, for easier integration into promises-all-the-things!

Bye Bye Javascript Promises!
async/await like code in JS?

rcss.js
A JavaScript library to generate responsive stylesheets.

Explorations In Automatically Fixing JavaScript Linting-errors
By Addy Osmani from Google

Calculating Standard Deviation with Array.map and Array.reduce, In JavaScript
A bit of a different challenge

More from @Meligy / GuruStop

Thanks a lot for making it that far. If you like what I brought you, let’s connect in even more ways!

Follow me on twitter — @Meligy

Check The Newsletter Archive — http://gurustop.net/newsletter

Get friends to receive the newsletter — http://gurustop.net/newsletter/signup

Remember that you can just reply to this email or mention me on twitter to tell me what you feel needs to change in next issue.

Until then,

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